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2019 Session Watch

 

Click on the topics below to learn more about legislation that could affect Virginia CPAs:

If you have questions or comments, contact VSCPA Vice President, Advocacy Emily Walker, CAE, at (804) 612-9428 or follow her at twitter.com/VSCPAEmWalker.

 

Tax conformity | Top

Bill number (Patron) Bill summary Position  Status 
HB 1851 (Peace)

Advances conformity of the Commonwealth's tax code with the federal tax code to December 31, 2018, starting with taxable year 2018. The bill increases, starting with taxable year 2019, the amount of the standard deduction (i) from $3,000 to $6,000 for an individual or for married persons filing separately and (ii) from $6,000 to $12,000 for married persons filing jointly. Starting in 2020, the bill adjusts Virginia's standard deduction by the percentage increase in the Chained Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (C-CPI-U) for the previous taxable year. In taxable year 2026, the standard deduction would return to $3,000 for an individual or a married person filing jointly and $6,000 for married persons filing jointly, coincident with the expiration of the individual income tax provisions of the federal Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA). Beginning in taxable year 2020, the individual tax brackets and the personal deductions will also be adjusted by the percentage increase of the C-CPI-U for the previous taxable year.

The bill reduces the corporate income tax from its current rate of six percent to five and one-half percent in 2018 and to five percent in 2019 and subsequent years. The bill provides that any additional revenues generated by the TCJA, beyond those revenues necessary to offset the reduction in revenues resulting from the provisions of the bill, shall be transferred to the Tax Policy Fund, created by the bill, to be used to provide tax reform to Virginia taxpayers starting in fiscal year 2020. The bill contains an emergency clause.

  HB 1851 is under discussion in the House Rules Committee.

HB 1980 (McNamara)

Advances conformity of the Commonwealth's tax code with the federal tax code to Dec. 31, 2018, and conforms to federal provisions that Virginia previously deconformed from, including the bonus depreciation deduction and the carry back of net operating losses.

 

 

 

 

 

HB 1980 is under discussion in the House Rules Committee.
HB 2086 (Watts)

Advances conformity of the Commonwealth's tax code with the federal tax code to Dec. 31, 2018. However, for taxable years 2018 through 2025, the bill deconforms from the provisions of Public Law 115-97, known as the "Tax Cuts and Jobs Act," that would suspend the overall limitation on itemized deductions.

The bill increases, for taxable years 2018 through 2025, the amount of the standard deduction to $4,500 for single individuals and $9,000 for married couples. Under current law, the standard deduction is $3,000 for single individuals and $6,000 for married couples. The bill adjusts Virginia's standard deduction for taxable years 2019 through 2025 by the percentage increase in the Chained Consumer Price Index for all Urban Consumers (C-CPI-U) for the previous taxable year. The bill contains an emergency clause.

The bill allows low-income individuals and married persons to claim either (i) a nonrefundable income tax credit equal to $300 for each individual, his spouse, and any dependents or (ii) an income tax credit equal to 20 percent of the federal earned income tax credit, a portion of which would be refundable. Fifty percent of the value of the credit would be refundable in taxable year 2018, and the refundable portion would increase by five percent each year, becoming fully refundable starting in taxable year 2028. Under current law, low-income individuals and married persons may elect either of these amounts; however, both options for claiming the credit are nonrefundable.

  HB 2086 is under discussion in the House Rules Committee.
HB 2110 (Freitas)
SB 1225 (Chase)

Advances conformity of the Commonwealth's tax code with the federal tax code to Dec. 31, 2018, starting with taxable year 2018. The bill increases, starting with taxable year 2019, the amount of the standard deduction (i) from $3,000 to $6,000 for an individual or for married persons filing separately and (ii) from $6,000 to $12,000 for married persons filing jointly. Starting in 2020, the bill adjusts Virginia's standard deduction by the percentage increase in the Chained Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (C-CPI-U) for the previous taxable year. In taxable year 2026, the standard deduction would return to $3,000 for an individual or a married person filing jointly and $6,000 for married persons filing jointly, coincident with the expiration of the individual income tax provisions of the federal Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA). Beginning in taxable year 2020, the individual tax brackets and the personal deductions will also be adjusted by the percentage increase of the C-CPI-U for the previous taxable year.

The bill reduces the corporate income tax from its current rate of 6 percent to 5.5 percent in 2018 and to 5 percent in 2019 and subsequent years. The bill provides that any additional revenues generated by the TCJA, beyond those revenues necessary to offset the reduction in revenues resulting from the provisions of the bill, shall be transferred to the Tax Policy Fund, created by the bill, to be used to provide tax reform to Virginia taxpayers starting in fiscal year 2020. The bill contains an emergency clause.

  HB 2110 is under discussion in the House Rules Committee. SB 1225 is under discussion in the Senate Finance Committee.

HB 2355 (C. Jones)
SB 1320 (Hanger)

Advances conformity of the Commonwealth's tax code with the federal tax code to Dec. 31, 2018, including conformity to the federal Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. The bill also makes technical amendments and contains an emergency clause.
Check mark on green background
HB 2355 is under discussion in the House Rules Committee. SB 1320 is under discussion in the Senate Finance Committee.
HB 2673 (D. Adams)

Advances the Commonwealth's conformity with federal tax law to December 31, 2018, starting with taxable year 2019. The bill allows an individual taxpayer to itemize for state income tax purposes regardless of whether he itemizes on his federal return for taxable years 2019 through 2025. Current law requires a taxpayer to claim the standard deduction on his state return if he claims the standard deduction on his federal return.

The bill increases the standard deduction to $3,500 for single individuals and $7,000 for married persons filing jointly for taxable years 2019 through 2025. Under current law, the standard deduction is $3,000 for single individuals and $6,000 for married persons filing jointly.

The bill allows low-income individuals and married persons to claim either (i) a nonrefundable income tax credit equal to $300 for each individual, his spouse, and each claimed dependent or (ii) an income tax credit equal to 20 percent of the federal earned income tax credit, a portion of which would be refundable. Thirty percent of the value of the credit would be refundable for taxable years 2019 through 2025. Under current law, low-income individuals and married persons may elect either of these amounts; however, both options for claiming the credit are nonrefundable.

  HB 2673 is under discussion in the House Rules Committee.
HB 2765 (D. Adams)

Advances the Commonwealth's conformity with federal tax law to Dec. 31, 2018, starting with taxable year 2019. The bill increases the standard deduction to $3,750 for single individuals and $7,500 for married persons filing jointly for taxable years 2019 through 2025. Under current law, the standard deduction is $3,000 for single individuals and $6,000 for married persons filing jointly.

The bill allows low-income individuals and married persons to claim either (i) a nonrefundable income tax credit equal to $300 for each individual, his spouse, and each claimed dependent or (ii) an income tax credit equal to 20 percent of the federal earned income tax credit, a portion of which would be refundable. Sixty percent of the value of the credit would be refundable for taxable years 2019 through 2025. Under current law, low-income individuals and married persons may elect either of these amounts; however, both options for claiming the credit are nonrefundable.

The bill provides that each year up to $198 million of any additional revenues generated by the federal Tax Cuts and Jobs Act would be transferred to the Revenue Stabilization Fund.

   
SB 1211 (Chafin) Advances conformity of the Commonwealth's tax code with the federal tax code to Dec. 31, 2018, including conformity to the federal Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. The bill raises Virginia's standard deduction to $6,000 per taxpayer or $12,000 for married persons filing jointly for taxable year 2018. In future tax years, the deduction will be adjusted by a percentage equal to the difference in the Chained Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers between the current year and 2018. The bill also contains an emergency clause.   SB 1211 is under discussion in the Senate Finance Committee.
SB 1372 (Norment) Advances conformity of the Commonwealth's tax code with the federal tax code to Dec. 31, 2018, including conformity to the federal Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. The bill also eliminates an obsolete provision and contains an emergency clause.
Check mark on green background
SB 1372 is under discussion in the Senate Finance Committee.
SB 1443 (Stuart)

Advances conformity of the Commonwealth's tax code with the federal tax code to Dec. 31, 2018, starting with taxable year 2018. The bill increases, starting with taxable year 2018, the amount of the standard deduction (i) from $3,000 to $6,000 for an individual or for married persons filing separately and (ii) from $6,000 to $12,000 for married persons filing jointly. Starting in 2019, the bill adjusts Virginia's standard deduction by the percentage increase in the Chained Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (C-CPI-U) for the previous taxable year. In taxable year 2026, the standard deduction would return to $3,000 for an individual or a married person filing jointly and $6,000 for married persons filing jointly, coincident with the expiration of the individual income tax provisions of the federal Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA). Beginning in taxable year 2020, the individual tax brackets and the personal deductions will also be adjusted by the percentage increase of the C-CPI-U for the previous taxable year.

The bill reduces the corporate income tax from its current rate of 6 percent to 5.5 percent in 2018 and to 5 percent in 2019 and subsequent years and establishes subtractions from Virginia corporate taxable income for the amount of global intangible low-taxed income that is included in federal taxable income and the amount of business interest that is disallowed as a deduction from federal taxable income.

The bill provides that any additional revenues generated by the TCJA, beyond those revenues necessary to offset the reduction in revenues resulting from the provisions of the bill, shall be transferred to the Tax Policy Fund, created by the bill, to be used to provide tax reform to Virginia taxpayers starting in fiscal year 2020. The bill contains an emergency clause.

  SB 1443 is under discussion in the Senate Finance Committee.
SB 1631 (Dunnavant)

Advances conformity of the Commonwealth's tax code with the federal tax code to Dec. 31, 2018, starting with taxable year 2018. The bill increases, starting with taxable year 2018, the amount of the standard deduction (i) from $3,000 to $6,000 for an individual or for married persons filing separately and (ii) from $6,000 to $12,000 for married persons filing jointly. Starting in 2019, the bill adjusts Virginia's standard deduction by the percentage increase in the Chained Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (C-CPI-U) for the previous taxable year. In taxable year 2026, the standard deduction would return to $3,000 for an individual or a married person filing jointly and $6,000 for married persons filing jointly, coincident with the expiration of the individual income tax provisions of the federal Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA). Beginning in taxable year 2020, the individual tax brackets and the personal deductions will also be adjusted by the percentage increase of the C-CPI-U for the previous taxable year.

The bill reduces the corporate income tax from its current rate of six percent to five and one-half percent in 2018 and to five percent in 2019 and subsequent years and establishes subtractions from Virginia corporate taxable income for the amount of global intangible low-taxed income that is included in federal taxable income and the amount of business interest that is disallowed as a deduction from federal taxable income.

The bill provides that any additional revenues generated by the TCJA, beyond those revenues necessary to offset the reduction in revenues resulting from the provisions of the bill, shall be transferred to the Tax Policy Fund, created by the bill, to be used to provide tax reform to Virginia taxpayers starting in fiscal year 2020. The bill contains an emergency clause.

  SB 1631 is under discussion in the Senate Finance Committee.
SB 1739 (Newman) Advances conformity of the Commonwealth's tax code with the federal tax code to Dec. 31, 2018, including conformity to the federal Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. The bill also directs any revenues collected by the Commonwealth as a result of the policy changes in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act be deposited into the Taxpayer Relief Fund, created by the bill. The Department of Taxation is directed to issue refunds on a pro rata basis to taxpayers who filed returns in the immediately preceding taxable year based on the amount of revenues deposited in the Fund. The revenue collection and refund would remain in place through taxable year 2026, the year the individual taxpayer changes in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act are set to expire. The bill contains an emergency clause.   SB 1739 is under discussion in the Senate Finance Committee.

Tax reform | Top

Bill number (Patron) Bill summary Position  Status 

HB 1618 (Bell)
SB 1237 (DeSteph)

Allows an individual taxpayer to itemize deductions for state income tax purposes regardless of whether he elects to itemize deductions on his federal return for taxable years 2018 through 2025. Current law requires a taxpayer to claim the standard deduction on his state return if he claims the standard deduction on his federal return. The bill contains an emergency clause.

 

 

 

 

 

HB 1618 is under discussion in the House Finance Committee. SB 1237 is under discussion in the Senate Finance Committee.
HB 2160 (Plum)
SB 1297 (Barker)
Allows low-income individuals and married persons to claim either (i) a nonrefundable income tax credit equal to $300 for each individual, his spouse, and any dependents or (ii) a refundable income tax credit equal to 20 percent of the federal earned income tax credit claimed that year by the individual or married persons. Under current law, low-income individuals and married persons may elect either of these amounts; however, both options for claiming the credit are nonrefundable. The provisions of the bill apply to taxable years beginning on and after Jan. 1, 2019, but before Jan. 1, 2026.   HB 2160 is under discussion in the House Finance Committee. SB 1297 is under discussion in the Senate Finance Committee.
HB 2442 (Wilt) Prohibits, beginning July 1, 2020, the accelerated collection of sales and use tax payments from retail merchants and other dealers who collect and return sales and use tax payments.   HB 2442 is under discussion in a House Finance subcommittee.
HB 2529 (Hugo)

Deconforms the Commonwealth's tax code from the provisions of the federal Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) that limit the deduction for state and local taxes and reduce the limits for the mortgage interest deduction.

The bill allows an individual taxpayer to itemize for state income tax purposes regardless of whether he itemizes on his federal return for taxable years 2019 through 2025. Current law requires a taxpayer to claim the standard deduction on his state return if he claims the standard deduction on his federal return.

The bill increases the standard deduction to $4,000 for single individuals and $8,000 for married persons filing jointly for taxable years 2019 through 2025. Under current law, the standard deduction is $3,000 for single individuals and $6,000 for married couples filing jointly.

The bill provides that any additional revenues generated by the TCJA, beyond those revenues necessary to offset the reduction in revenues resulting from the provisions of the bill, shall be transferred to the Tax Policy Fund, created by the bill, to be used to provide tax reform to Virginia taxpayers starting in fiscal year 2020.

  HB 2529 is under discussion in the House Rules Committee.
HB 2700 (Orrock) Establishes a subtraction in computing Virginia taxable income for the amount of Global Intangible Low-Taxed Income that is included in a corporation's federal taxable income.   HB 2700 is under discussion in the House Rules Committee.
HB 2701 (Orrock) Establishes a subtraction from a corporation's Virginia taxable income for the amount of business interest that is disallowed as a deduction from federal taxable income by § 163(j) of the Internal Revenue Code.   HB 2701 is under discussion in the House Rules Committee.
HB 2704 (Bloxom) Provides that, if the General Assembly does not enact legislation during the 2019 Session giving at least $100 million in Virginia income tax relief to Virginia taxpayers, any additional revenues generated by the federal Tax Cuts and Jobs Act shall be transferred to the Tax Policy Fund, created by the act. The bill requires the Governor to submit, with his budget proposal for the 2020-2022 biennium, a plan to provide tax reform to Virginia taxpayers with revenues in the Tax Policy Fund. Such tax reform shall distribute such additional revenues to Virginia taxpayers proportionately on the basis of their Virginia income tax liability for taxable year 2018.   HB 2704 is under discussion in the House Rules Committee.
HB 2708 (Pogge) Allows an individual taxpayer to itemize for state income tax purposes regardless of whether he itemizes on his federal return. Current law requires a taxpayer to claim the standard deduction on his state return if he claims the standard deduction on his federal return.   HB 2708 is under discussion in the House Rules Committee.
SB 1572 (Norment) Raises the minimum threshold for filing a Virginia tax return to $15,000 for an individual and $30,000 for married persons filing jointly, for taxable years beginning on or after Jan. 1, 2019. Under current law, the minimum threshold for filing a Virginia tax return is $11,950 for an individual and $23,300 for married persons filing jointly for taxable years beginning on and after Jan. 1, 2012.   SB 1572 is under discussion in the Senate Finance Committee.
SB 1630 (Norment) Entitles an individual to a tax refund equal to $150, or $300 for married persons filing a joint return. An individual will only be eligible for the credit if his tax liability after the application of deductions, subtractions, and credits exceeds $150, or for married persons filing jointly if their tax liability exceeds $300. The refund would apply to taxable years beginning on and after Jan. 1, 2018, but before Jan. 1, 2026. The bill contains an emergency clause.   SB 1630 is under discussion in the Senate Finance Committee.
SB 1657 (McDougle) Creates a nonrefundable tax credit of $250 for individuals and $500 for married persons filing a joint return. The credit is available for taxable years 2018 through 2025 and is available only to taxpayers who elected to take the standard deduction on their federal tax returns. The bill contains an emergency clause.   SB 1657 is under discussion in the Senate Finance Committee.
SB 1744 (Wagner) Increases the standard deduction to $4,000 for individuals and $8,000 for married persons filing joint returns for taxable year 2018. The bill contains an emergency clause.   SB 1744 is under discussion in the Senate Finance Committee.

Remote sales tax (Wayfair) | Top

Bill number (Patron) Bill summary Position  Status 

HB 1722 (Bloxom)
SB 1294 (Howell)

Directs the Department of Taxation (the Department) to require a remote seller to collect sales and use tax if the seller has more than $100,000 in annual gross revenue from sales in Virginia or at least 200 sales transactions in Virginia and requires a marketplace facilitator, which enables marketplace sellers to sell in Virginia through its marketplace, to collect sales and use tax if its annual gross revenue from facilitated sales in Virginia exceeds $100,000 or it facilitates at least 200 sales transactions in Virginia. The bill provides that the obligation of remote sellers and marketplace facilitators to collect sales and use tax shall not apply to transactions occurring before July 1, 2019.

The bill provides that in administering remote sales and use tax collection, the Department shall provide information to remote sellers to allow them to identify state and local tax rates and exemptions. For auditing purposes, the Department is directed to allow a remote seller to complete a single audit covering all localities. The bill requires the Department to give remote sellers at least 30 days' notice of any change in tax rate.

The bill provides that if a remote seller or marketplace facilitator collects an incorrect amount of tax, it shall be relieved of liability for failure to collect the correct amount if the error is the result of its reliance on information provided by Virginia. The bill also relieves a marketplace facilitator of liability if it collects an incorrect amount of tax based on certain incorrect information provided by a seller or purchaser.

The bill repeals several contingent provisions of previous related bills that would take effect if the United States Congress enacted legislation related to remote sales and use tax collection. The bill contains technical corrections.

 

 

 

 

 

HB 1722 is under discussion in the House Rules Committee. SB 1294 is under discussion in the Senate Finance Committee.
HB 2090 (Watts)
SB 1083 (Ruff)

Directs the Department of Taxation (the Department) to require a remote seller to collect sales and use tax if the seller has more than $100,000 in annual gross revenue from sales in Virginia or at least 200 sales transactions in Virginia and requires a marketplace facilitator, which enables marketplace sellers to sell in Virginia through its marketplace, to collect sales and use tax if its annual gross revenue from facilitated sales in Virginia exceeds $100,000 or it facilitates at least 200 sales transactions in Virginia. The bill provides that the obligation of remote sellers and marketplace facilitators to collect sales and use tax shall not apply to transactions occurring before July 1, 2019.

The bill provides that in administering remote sales and use tax collection, the Department shall provide information to remote sellers to allow them to identify state and local tax rates and exemptions. For auditing purposes, the Department is directed to allow a remote seller to complete a single audit covering all localities. The bill requires the Department to give remote sellers at least 30 days' notice of any change in tax rate.

The bill provides that if a remote seller or marketplace facilitator collects an incorrect amount of tax, it shall be relieved of liability for failure to collect the correct amount if the error is the result of its reliance on information provided by Virginia. The bill also relieves a marketplace facilitator of liability if it collects an incorrect amount of tax based on certain incorrect information provided by a seller or purchaser.

The bill repeals several contingent provisions of previous related bills that would take effect if the United States Congress enacted legislation related to remote sales and use tax collection. The bill contains technical corrections.

  HB 2090 is under discussion in the House Rules Committee. SB 1083 is under discussion in the Senate Finance Committee.
SB 1267 (Stuart)

Directs the Department of Taxation (the Department) to require a remote seller to collect sales and use tax if the seller has more than $100,000 in annual gross revenue from sales in Virginia or at least 200 sales transactions in Virginia and requires a marketplace facilitator, which enables marketplace sellers to sell in Virginia through its marketplace, to collect sales and use tax if its annual gross revenue from facilitated sales in Virginia exceeds $100,000 or it facilitates at least 200 sales transactions in Virginia. The bill provides that the obligation of remote sellers and marketplace facilitators to collect sales and use tax shall not apply to transactions occurring before July 1, 2019.

The bill provides that in administering remote sales and use tax collection, the Department shall provide information to remote sellers to allow them to identify state and local tax rates and exemptions. For auditing purposes, the Department is directed to allow a remote seller to complete a single audit covering all localities. The bill requires the Department to give remote sellers at least 30 days' notice of any change in tax rate.

The bill provides that if a remote seller or marketplace facilitator collects an incorrect amount of tax, it shall be relieved of liability for failure to collect the correct amount if the error is the result of its reliance on information provided by Virginia. The bill also relieves a marketplace facilitator of liability if it collects an incorrect amount of tax based on certain incorrect information provided by a seller or purchaser.

The bill allocates revenue from the state portion of remote sales and use tax collection to the Transportation Trust Fund but requires the revenue to be spent only to fund improvements to existing roads. The bill distributes the local portion to localities based on point of sale.

The bill repeals several contingent provisions of previous related bills that would take effect if the United States Congress enacted legislation related to remote sales and use tax collection. The bill contains technical corrections.

  SB 1267 is under discussion in the Senate Finance Committee.
SB 1500 (Hanger)

Directs the Department of Taxation (the Department) to require a remote seller to collect sales and use tax if the seller has more than $100,000 in annual gross revenue from sales in Virginia or at least 200 sales transactions in Virginia and requires a marketplace facilitator, which enables marketplace sellers to sell in Virginia through its marketplace, to collect sales and use tax if its annual gross revenue from facilitated sales in Virginia exceeds $100,000 or it facilitates at least 200 sales transactions in Virginia. The bill provides that the obligation of remote sellers and marketplace facilitators to collect sales and use tax shall not apply to transactions occurring before July 1, 2019.

The bill provides that in administering remote sales and use tax collection, the Department shall provide information to remote sellers to allow them to identify state and local tax rates and exemptions. For auditing purposes, the Department is directed to allow a remote seller to complete a single audit covering all localities. The bill requires the Department to give remote sellers at least 30 days' notice of any change in tax rate.

The bill provides that if a remote seller or marketplace facilitator collects an incorrect amount of tax, it shall be relieved of liability for failure to collect the correct amount if the error is the result of its reliance on information provided by Virginia. The bill also relieves a marketplace facilitator of liability if it collects an incorrect amount of tax based on certain incorrect information provided by a seller or purchaser.

The bill repeals several contingent provisions of previous related bills that would take effect if the United States Congress enacted legislation related to remote sales and use tax collection. The bill contains technical corrections.

  SB 1500 is under discussion in the Senate Finance Committee.
SB 1601 (Norment) Requires certain marketplace facilitators and marketplace sellers, defined in the bill, to collect and remit sales and use tax if such facilitators or sellers make sales of tangible personal property or taxable services for delivery in the Commonwealth exceeding $100,000 or in 200 or more separate transactions. The bill provides that facilitators and sellers may enter into agreements regarding the fulfillment of the collection requirements. The bill prohibits class action from being brought against a marketplace facilitator on behalf of customers for overpayment of sales and use tax collected by the marketplace facilitator. The bill provides that the sales and use tax collection requirements shall not apply to any sales transactions occurring before July 1, 2019.   SB 1601 is under discussion in the Senate Finance Committee.

Procurement/government contracting | Top

Bill number (Patron) Bill summary Position  Status 

HB 1796 (Cole)

Allows public bodies to request price information in a Request for Proposal for professional services.

 

 

 

 

 

HB 1796 was laid on the table in a House General Laws subcommittee on Jan. 15.
HB 2271 (Poindexter) Prohibits public employers from permitting any person employed by a private entity to perform professional services for such private entity upon the premises of such public employer or otherwise share office space with the employees of such public employer. The bill also prohibits a public employer from accepting funds from a private entity for the purposes of employing a former or current employee of the private entity to perform professional services for the public employer. The bill defines "private entity" and "professional services."   HB 2271 is under discussion in the House General Laws Committee.
HB 2072 (J. Bell)
SB 1345 (Favola)

Provides that for competitive negotiation for professional services, a public body may conduct negotiations simultaneously with the top two ranked offerors if the public body does not request or discuss nonbinding estimates of total project costs at the discussion stage and as long as such process is set forth in the Request for Proposal.

  HB 2072 was laid on the table in a House General Laws subcommittee on Jan. 15. SB 1345 was defeated in the Senate General Laws & Technology Committee on Jan. 14.

Other topics | Top

The VSCPA and volunteer members are in the process of identifying additional bills that may of interest to Virginia CPAs. The VSCPA has not taken positions on these bills, but is monitoring them for informational purposes. Check back for a list of bills the VSCPA is monitoring.